Iowa caucus Did the record-breaking night change everything?

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Monday was a night of surprises, comebacks, and record turnouts with Sen. Ted Cruz surpassing Donald Trump, who ended up just ahead of Sen. Marco Rubio on the Republican side of the Iowa presidential caucus.

As for the Democratic candidates, despite former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton already declaring herself a winner, that race is still too close to call according to many sources.

After Monday’s result, Republican candidate Mike Huckabee and Democrat Martin O’Malley both announced they were suspending their campaigns. Huckabee won the Iowa presidential caucus in 2008.

Despite the predictions of both pundits and soothsayers claiming that the New York real estate developer had the Iowa vote in the bag, the Texas senator managed to grab 28 percent of the vote, as compared to Trump’s 24 percent and Rubio’s 23. It was a record turnout for Republicans, Fox News reported.

The remaining GOP contenders came in single digits.

Cruz, who both won and set a record as being the candidate who garnered the most caucus votes in history, according to Fox News, saw his victory as a clear message to establishment Republicans.

“Tonight is a victory for the grassroots. Tonight is a victory for courageous conservatives across Iowa and all across this great nation,” Cruz told cheering supporters.

With the one point squeaker between Trump and Rubio, the Florida senator saw it as a victory of sorts also.

“The media and the establishment had written me off weeks ago, but we proved them wrong,” he said in an email to supporters.

So what does this mean for Trump? Sen. Ben Sasse, a Nebraska Republican tweeted:

By 3-1 margin, Iowa Rs reject @realDonaldTrump
He should now answer real policy& exec power questions OR exit the race

Pundit David Burge gave a touch of humor:

Trump says he wants to buy a farm in Iowa; wife says “New Yorlk is vere a vant to stay”

Clinton swayed 49.9 percent of the voters to her camp, while Sanders took 49.6 percent with 10 precincts not yet reporting.

Clinton took at least three of the precincts — in Des Moines, Davenport, and Ames — by coin tosses.

But no matter the outcome, the Democratic result spells out a “profound message” to medias and the Democratic establishment, according to Sen. Bernie Sanders, who trailed Clinton by as much as 30 points during the summer.

“I want to be clear with you about what this really means,” Sanders told his supporters in an email. “Tonight’s result is a victory for our political revolution. We have proved that when people come together, anything is possible.”

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